In the Kumano area, almost every shrine has its own parking or bus stop to visit. However, I walked from Daimon Zaka to Nachi waterfall enjoying the cobbled slope with mossy stone steps and cider trees.

Kumano Nakahechi route is in low mountains, so temperature and weather are fairly stable, but rain gear, hat, towel and water would be preferable to bring.

Daimon Zaka start point

Daimon Zaka start point

Daimon Zaka's gate

Daimon Zaka’s gate

Daimon Zaka path

Daimon Zaka path

Kumano Nachi Shrine’s treasure museum displays precious artifacts, ancient picture scrolls and mandala posters. One of the Mandalas shows old Kumano Nachi Shrine, including an old camphor tree that is still existing next to the main shrine. The inside of the tree is hollow, so I could enter and go through it.

Kumano Nachi Shrine

Kumano Nachi Shrine

Camphor tree

Camphor tree

Camphor tree's gate

Camphor tree’s gate

Nachi Seiganto temple, located next to Kumano Nachi Shrine, is a symbol of the integration of Shinto and Buddhism.

Seiganto Temple is said to have been founded in the early 5th century by a priest from India. At a temple, you don’t need to clap twice here, because the god is in the front of you. There is no need to call the god by clapping.

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Nachi Seiganto temple